Poster Session - Friday, March 4th, 10:30am

Library as Conduit: Creating Meaningful Venues for Disseminating Student Scholarship

Abstract
This poster details how a library created a student research colloquium series and founded an open-access online journal for its award-winning papers. These activities have engaged students in valuable real-world learning experiences, developed student and faculty collaborations, and built advocacy for open-access scholarly communication, all while contributing to student success and research sharing. The session will offer lessons learned and best practices, and encourage the audience to experiment with these types of activities.

  • Presenter
    • Joe Clark, Kent State University

Music for Children in Academic Libraries and Scholarship

Abstract
Unlike the study of children’s literature, music for children has not received much if any scholarly treatment. There are many possible reasons why this style of music has not been studied. There is the potential lack of interest akin to attitudes about popular and film music of previous decades. In addition, there could be scholarly or social stigma associated with studying music that is not part of an accepted canon in musicological circles, or worse, perceived as infantile. More importantly, there are considerable access issues that libraries could remedy by building collections of and centers for the study of music for children. While there are a few nationally known performers, the majority of music making for children happens locally and is simply not available for study. For that reason, the demographics of an area can also impact the creation of music for children, its preservation, and ultimately scholars’ access to the music itself. This poster session will define what music for children is as opposed to “children’s music,” compare its study to that of children’s literature, explain the many barriers to its study, and provide a full list of musicological and a selected list educational and psychological scholarship on the study of music for children. It will also include topics which future scholarship could aim to answer about this style of music.

  • Presenter
    • Angela Pratesi, University of Northern Iowa

ANSCRing the question: A hands-on approach to sound recording

Abstract
A recently conducted survey affirmed that a majority of music libraries use an accession-based and closed-stacks system for sound recordings. Yet with CD circulation dwindling, these systems make our collections even less accessible to patrons. This poster will demonstrate the benefits of a genre-based classification system and open stacks for music libraries, and present a roadmap for those interested in a similar switch. Using the example of an accession-to-ANSCR migration at Sarah Lawrence College, a small liberal arts school in New York, this poster discusses the benefits to user confidence, serendipitous discovery, and challenges such a change can bring.

  • Presenter
    • Charlotte Price, Barnard College

Smart Shifting for Less Maintenance

Abstract
Planning for growth is an important part of managing print collections, and reallocating space by shifting materials is a necessary but laborious task. The literature suggests that, in most shifting projects in academic libraries, growth space is determined at the level of LC class. Within a music library collection, however, growth rates can vary widely within a single class (M, ML or MT). This poster will explain how to calculate shelf fill rates for a collection shift in a more granular and precise way, tying growth space to acquisition patterns. By putting the right amount of growth space in each area of the stacks, the need for future shifting can be reduced.

  • Presenter
    • Clayton Crenshaw, Baylor University

Musical Pop-ups: performances in unexpected places for National Poetry Month, 2015

Abstract
The poster will document musical performances at Western Michigan University for the University Libraries’ celebration of National Poetry Month, from April 1-17, 2015. Three librarians and the communication coordinator of the Western Michigan University Libraries arranged events for the celebration, including instrumental and vocal music performances. We aimed to include as many performers from as many units on campus as we could in order to increase the University Libraries’ visibility, and to make diverse campus units aware of the kinds of performances done in other parts of the University. The musical performances were mostly informal performances that took place in unexpected venues, or what we called “pop-up” events, but we had a formal, concert-style musical performance at our opening event, along with poetry readings. The events took place in the Waldo Library (our main library), the Harper C. Maybee Music and Dance Library, the Gary and Rita Swain Education Library, and the lobby of the Lee Honors College. The musical performances included two wind quintets, a woodwind quartet, a horn quartet, two choral performances, two solo piano performances, and a tuba and voice duet. We conducted a survey to collect feedback data from our user community. This poster will present photographs, printed material, and analysis of our survey data, specifically related to the musical performances.

  • Presenter
    • Michael Duffy, Western Michigan University

The Morris and Barnard Young Music Business Records: Barney and Gloria, A "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" Copyright Case, and Researching Outside the Canon of Twentieth-Century Popular Music

Abstract
This poster will present a study of the Morris and Barnard Young Music Business Records, 1832-1988, a collection at the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It will begin with an overview of the collection and the careers of the musicians it documents, Barnard (Barney) Young and Gloria Parker. Barney Young was a New York music publisher, composer, and manager from the 1930s-1960s. He was closely associated with Gloria Parker, marimba and musical glasses virtuoso, who was his star performer, co-composer, and fiancé. Barney’s overarching goal was to establish a music conglomerate in which he would profit from all stages of production, and he was associated with over 40 music corporations during his lifetime. Highlights of his career included bringing multiple lawsuits against ASCAP, BMI, CBS, and NBC, suing Disney over the ownership of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious," and starting a performing rights organization to provide royalty-free songs to the jukebox industry. The “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” case and its implications in terms of music copyright will be examined in detail. The presentation will also reflect on the importance of the inclusion of “minor” musicians and music corporations in the narrative of music history, the challenges and opportunities faced by patrons researching twentieth-century popular music and musicians, and ways libraries and archives can facilitate their research.

  • Presenter
    • Elizabeth York, University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma

Playing in Seven: The Multi-Year Path to a New Music Library

Abstract
As Canadian academic libraries struggle to re-invent themselves in the wake of budget cuts and new models of librarianship, music library spaces are vulnerable. Music librarians have both the challenge of justifying their own existence, and the opportunity to reinvent themselves and their spaces to remain relevant to their specialized community and to the library system as a whole. Jan Guise will present the new Eckhardt-Gramatté Music Library at the University of Manitoba. This is an embedded library which moved to its new home alongside the Faculty of Music in 2015. She will discuss the library's collaborative relationship with the faculty and students, as well as the planning, consultation, moving, and re-opening processes. She will also highlight opportunities for innovation in the new space.

  • Presenter
    • Janneka Guise, University of Manitoba

Let Them Make Noise: library programs engaging with curriculum and community

Abstract
In the fall of 2014, the music library at the University of Virginia reopened after a significant refurbishment. Inspired by the open and inviting main reading room, I initiated a series of events dubbed “Making Noise in the Music Library.” The series title gently pokes at the traditional image of a quiet library and shushing librarian, but it also clearly describes the focus of the series: music or sound. I allowed anyone directly or indirectly involved in the University to apply to the series but had few other limitations. The resulting presentations, performances, and installations were diverse and included student, faculty, and community member work. The series sparked great interest among the faculty and graduate students in the music department, and the library has been asked to collaborate with departmental events for the next academic year. The resulting events will include the study of music (through co-hosting colloquia and methodological workshops with visiting experts) and music performance (by hosting receptions during the popular “Tea Time Recitals,” which feature juried performances by music students and faculty). In this poster, I will share how I sought to support the study and practice of music through this series and how it developed into a model for library involvement that far exceeded my initial expectations. This program makes the library itself a locus of the types of scholarly and artistic conversations that typically happen in non-library spaces, simply by inviting music and noise (and refreshments!) into a controlled environment. While the events are temporary, the conversations they have engendered have helped make the music library and its staff more central to scholarly endeavors at UVa.

  • Presenter
    • Matthew Vest, University of California, Los Angeles

From the Library to the Practice Room: Providing Point of Need Research Help

Abstract
While music majors have numerous research needs as they complete music history courses and prepare for master classes and recitals, if the library is not located within their academic building, they are often reluctant to make the trek across campus to find resources. At Towson University, Performing Arts Librarian Lisa Woznicki has worked to break down these barriers by bringing weekly research assistance sessions directly into the Center for the Arts building. This program will focus on the strategies used to organize and schedule weekly research help sessions in the building’s café area, taking advantage of student and faculty availability during lunch time and bringing assistance directly to users beyond the walls of the library. Examples of tools and documents created for the service will be provided including a description of the physical set up and technology requirements. Publicity materials and promotional activities for the service will be described, along with feedback received from students and faculty. The array of categories of queries answered will be shared and also record keeping for interaction statistics and follow up activities. A best practices list for setting up a similar service will be provided as well as time for question and answer with attendees.

  • Presenter
    • Lisa Woznicki, Towson University
  • Location
    • 3rd Floor Lobby
  • Live Streaming?
    • No

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